A-Snoring We Will Go

This is one way Annie likes to sleep.

It happens on a regular basis I’ll be working on something or in the middle of watching a show or even trying to fall asleep and….

SNNNNOOOOORRE!

The loud, throaty vibrating sound erupts from Annie.

I’ll look over to see her sleeping contently, oblivious to the noise she’s making.

Sometimes it’s funny, and sometimes it’s annoying. But I guess that’s the way things are in both pet-human and human-human relationships. The other being can’t be the perfect white horse, prince, princess, knight, or perfect whatever all the time. They’d have to be fake all the time to achieve that.

I prefer authenticity, and Annie sure as heck doesn’t care for pretending to be anything. She’s true to herself, snores and all.

But I did get to wondering if her loud snoring could be a health problem, like it can be in humans, and here’s what I found from some light research.

  1. Know the nose- The flatter the dog’s face/shorter the nose, the more the dog’s breathing is naturally constricted, making them likely to snore. (Being a beagle, that’s not what’s causing Annie’s snoring.)
  2. Weight- If the dog is overweight, they are more at risk for snoring. I don’t think Annie’s that fat, but others have described her as chubby so….
  3. How the dog sleeps affects how they snore- Apparently, if the dog sleeps on its back or with its head lower than the rest of its body, it increases its probability of snoring. That’s why those dog beds with raised sides are good. Being able to sleep with their head lifted up opens up their airways, making snoring less likely. Annie, well, as you can see in the picture above, she has some interesting ways she likes to sleep.
  4. Air Dryness-How humid the place you and your dog live is also influences their snoring. The drier the air, the more at risk you are for hearing your dog “enjoying” their sleep. This is because dry air dries out the nose and throat. Since Annie and I live in a very dry climate, using a diffuser or humidifier could help diminish her snoring.

As you can see, I have a couple of things to try to decrease those loud snores of Annie’s.

There is a chance that a dog’s snoring can be caused by sleep apnea or an infection in the nose, mouth, or throat. However, since Annie recently had a vet appointment and came out with a clean bill of health (and clean teeth), I don’t think anything serious is causing her to snore.

I’ll try experimenting to see if any of the above methods work, especially since they seem to be good for Annie and not just for my benefit. But, if she continues to snore like a rhino, I’ll still love her, noise and all.

Also, don’t forget that we have a YouTube channel you can visit for funny and cute videos of Annie!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr3oDeQ_7SU00HMC2OX6lkA

Research for this post came from these sites below.

https://wagwalking.com/wellness/how-to-prevent-your-dog-from-snoring

https://m.petmd.com/dog/conditions/respiratory/does-your-dog-have-snoring-problem

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