A Belated Christmas Card

Merry Christmas!

Annie and I wanted to stop in real quick and say Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to everyone!

We had a good day with some family. I talked with loved ones while Annie made sure to steal cookies from the little ones.

Annie got a new sweater and a new collar.

I got her this cute collar from Meoyani on Etsy.

We’re ready for 2020 to be over, but in the week that’s left, we’ll continue enjoying each other’s company.

We’ll see you again in the new year with more wags and smiles!

Thank You, Annie Dog

I wanted to take a moment this Thanksgiving to write about how grateful I am for my Annie dog. If you read our origin story post, then you’ll know that Annie came into my life when I was really struggling. She’s one of the main reasons I was able to stop self-harming when I was at the lowest point I’ve ever been.

She’s sweet, friendly, and loves attention. If I lie down on the floor, she’ll come right up to me and snuggle in next to my neck.

She snores, she’s whiny, gets powerful gas, and I don’t know if all her fur will ever grow back. But, I love her.

I recently read a book called 12 Rules for Life. The author made an interesting comment that we love people because of their limitations. A person’s limitations are just as much of what makes individuals unique as their strengths. I thought that was a powerful thought, and I think it applies to our love for our pets too. Complete love means recognizing the other completely, including the things you like and the things you don’t like about them. Annie is such a great example of this. She loves me completely, and I feel that from her. I hope to learn how to incorporate this true love into the way I treat others.

Thanks, Annie dog, for coming into my life when you did.

Thank you to everyone who’s been reading about our experiences. Happy Thanksgiving!

Fixed? Fix What?

Annie recovering after surgery and wearing one of my old shirts so she won’t lick the incision site.

Yep, you guessed it. Annie got spayed.

Getting Annie dog fixed was something I’d been planning on doing sometime every since I adopted her; however, since she was still recovering from mange, then an ear infection, and then a paw infection when I got her, I wanted to wait until she was healthy before I had it done.

Then, after those conditions cleared up, her hair was still taking a long time to grow back. It still hasn’t come back completely although she has a lot more now than when I first met her.

Earlier this year when she got her teeth cleaned, I had the vet’s office also do a full blood panel to see if there was anything else going on. Everything came back in normal range, and she doesn’t act sick, so she’s healthy.

The other thing preventing me from getting her spayed earlier on was that I was strapped for cash. Due to my own medical bills and financial obligations, I just couldn’t afford to get her fixed (which was fine with Annie, I’m sure).

But this year, Annie and I have both been blessed with better health and an improving financial state, so I finally scheduled that appointment.

Everything went well, but Annie gave me the “How could you let them do this to me?” look for a couple of days afterward. I was a little worried when she didn’t eat anything (except like 2 dog treats) for a few days following the surgery, but she started feeling better and is doing fine now.

I researched a little about spaying dogs before taking Annie to the vet, and here’s the gist of what I learned:

  1. Spaying an animal means removing the entire uterus and ovaries. Although, there is an option out there for just removing the ovaries.
  2. A female dog’s behavior can be influenced by having these parts removed because it affects hormone production. It seemed like it might calm them down some, but I got the vibe it doesn’t affect a female’s mood as much as a male’s mood is affected by getting neutered. However, it will not change their personality completely.
  3. It can help prevent mammary tumors (My childhood dog, who never got spayed, had a benign one of these.) and serious uterine infections.
  4. There’s potential that spaying your dog can help them live longer. Not sure why, but supposedly it can increase their natural lifespan.
  5. A dog’s metabolism slows down after being spayed.

It’s been almost 2 weeks now, and Annie dog has mostly recovered! She has some scarring down her lower belly. This may or may not be permanent.

I plan to do something fun with her soon to make up for what she’s had to endure.

Do you have any “tales” about getting your pets fixed?

Lots of tail wags and smiles from Annie and me!

Information can be found at https://www.petmd.com/dog/care/spay-and-neutering-dogs-101-everything-you-need-know#:~:text=When%20a%20female%20dog%20is,and%20eliminates%20her%20heat%20cycle.&text=When%20neutering%20a%20dog%2C%20both,is%20also%20known%20as%20castration. and https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/spaying-in-dogs .