But…I’m the baby…and you’re the baby too?

Annie feeling the need to be involved with playing the board game too.

It’s become a fairly normal thing to refer to your pet as a “fur baby”. While I don’t really use that term with my Annie dog, she certainly fits the title some days!

For instance, sometimes after she comes in from outside in the morning, she just wants to cuddle on my bed with me. (I kind of like the validation that she loves me, actually). She loves being petted and snuggled with. If I lie down on the floor, she’s quick to jog over and lie down next to me, her face next to mine. In fact, if I lie down on the floor and don’t show her affection (like if I’m exercising or stretching or playing a board game), she gets confused. Apparently, what else would I lie down on the floor for if not for her?

However, in addition to being the baby, Annie likes mothering babies.

One time I tried to save a stray kitten. We couldn’t find her mom for more than a day, and her little siblings had frozen in the cold. Unfortunately, the kitten, which I’d named Bella, died in the end, but while she was alive, Annie just wanted to whine and smother her with love. Her “affection” was strong enough that I had to keep the kitten out of her reach most of the time since the kitten was so small and fragile.

It doesn’t end with animal babies, either. Annie likes human babies. Every time a baby comes over to the house, she whines and wags her tail in excitement, following the baby carrier around. She just has to say “hello” to the baby.

Beagles are known for being friendly dogs and great for families. According to the American Kennel Club, it’s “no wonder that for years the Beagle has been the most popular hound dog among American pet owners” (https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/beagle/). I can attest that Annie fits the stereotype there. She’s a sweetheart, really. She may get spooked easily, but Annie is loving, trusting, and will let you do just about anything to her as long as you pet her.

Annie just loves love, whether she’s receiving it or giving it. Just like an innocent, furry baby.

A Dog’s Selfishness Is Different

Happy New Year!

Annie wearing her bandana

I’ve spent more time away from home the second half of 2019 than I have before in the two years I’ve owned Annie. This also means that I’ve spent more time away from Annie than ever.

She’s been a pretty good sport about it, which is saying a lot considering how bad her separation anxiety was when I first adopted her. My little Annie dog has gotten stronger. Pardon me for feeling a ping of pride when I think about that.

Some things have happened in my personal life that have left me thinking about what people expect from each other and how no relationship realistically (as far as I can tell) exists without each party being a little selfish. After all, you should feel comfortable asking for things in an authentic relationship, right? They should be reasonable things, and each side has to be willing to give, of course.

Personally, I struggle with asking for things from others. I may think about it, but it’s difficult to say.

That’s one reason why I love dogs: their selfishness is different than humans.

Annie is open about what she wants and doesn’t hide how she feels. It’s all there in her body language. Yet, when she’s being selfish, demanding my attention for more cuddles more letting me know it’s time to feed her, there’s an innocence in it that I don’t see in adults. I never feel used or like I’m getting the bad end of the deal. It’s simple, open, loving communication. I give her love, and she gives love back. There’s no need to make it complicated.

Annie’s selfishness is innocent.

How grateful I am that I have Annie dog, and that she looks past all the faults I have (if she even notices them in the first place) and simply loves me. She gives me hope, and that’s a powerful thing to give.